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External guidelines  

Deadlines

Proposals are due on the date specified or the next working day if the date falls on a weekend or holiday. Proposals for UW System grant programs are to be submitted at least 5 working days before the deadline to the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs. Please see the UW-System grants page for current deadline and program information.

Protection of Human Subjects

The UW-Eau Claire policies and procedures for the protection of human subjects have been established in accordance with U.S. Department of Health and Human Services regulations (45 CFR Part 46, "Protection of Human Subjects," as amended) as well as state and University regulations to protect the rights and welfare of human subjects utilized in research projects. Any research project, either funded or unfunded, originated at or supported by the University, that involves human subjects must be reviewed and approved by the Institutional Review Board for the Protection of Human Subjects. The Guide to the Preparation of proposals for Submission to the Institutional Review Board for the Protection of Human Subjects is available in the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs. 

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Protection of Animals

The UW-Eau Claire Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) is responsible for the review and approval of any research, research training, experimentation, and biological testing and related activities involving live vertebrate animals. The contact person is Dr. Dan Janik, Chair, IACUC, (715) 836-5023.

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Scientific Misconduct Policy and Procedures

Misconduct in science is defined as fabrication, falsification, plagiarism, or other practices that seriously deviate from those that are commonly accepted within the scientific community for proposing, conducting, or reporting research. Misconduct in science is prohibited and could result in disciplinary action up to and including dismissal. UW-Eau Claire’s Policies and Procedures on Scientific Misconduct document indicates how the University will respond to allegations of research misconduct. 


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Fringe Benefit

Fringe benefit rates to be used by the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire in charging external funds for the employer's contribution to fringe benefits are set by UW System. These are found at: www.uwsa.edu/fadmin/fringes.htm. Contact the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs for assistance when developing grant proposal budgets.

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Indirect Cost Rates

It is the policy of the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire to recover the Federal Negotiated Indirect Cost Rate from all agencies that are legally bound by that agreement and from all other federal, state, and private funding sources that will reimburse the University at the negotiated rate. There are two different rates, on-campus and off-campus. Both rates are calculated using the same formula. These rates are based on the total salaries, wages, and fringe benefits being requested in the grant or contract proposal.

On-Campus Rate: 45.5%
Off-Campus Rate: 16%

Financial Conflicts of Interest in Public Health Service-Funded Research 

I. Policy

Consistent with federal regulations, beginning on August 24, 2012, all faculty and academic staff at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire who plan to participate in, or are participating in, Public Health Service (PHS)-funded research must fully disclose potential financial conflicts of interest and successfully complete financial conflict of interest training.  The purpose of this policy is to comply with PHS regulations on Responsibility of Applicants for Promoting Objectivity in Research for which PHS Funding is Sought (42 C.F.R. Part 50, Subpart F) and Responsible Prospective Contractors (45 C.F.R. Part 94). These regulations promote objectivity in research by establishing standards that provide a reasonable expectation that the design, conduct, and reporting of research funded under PHS grants or cooperative agreements will be free from bias resulting from investigator financial conflicts of interest.

II. Procedures

A.  Disclosure
According to the National Institutes of Health, a potential financial conflict of interest exists when an investigator has significant financial interests that could lead an independent observer to reasonably question whether the design, conduct, or reporting of research might be influenced by the possibility of personal gain to the individual or his or her immediate family (i.e., spouse and dependent children). As a result, all faculty and academic staff who plan to participate in, or are participating in, PHS-funded research must submit a Financial Conflicts of Interest Disclosure Form no later than at the time of application, within 30 days of discovering or acquiring a new significant financial interest, and at least annually during the period of award.

Examples of significant financial interests that must be disclosed include the following:

  • When the value of any remuneration received from an entity in the twelve months preceding the disclosure and the value of any equity interest (e.g., stocks, stock options, or ownership interests) in the entity as of the date of disclosure, when aggregated, exceeds $5,000.
  • When any equity interest in a non-publicly traded entity is held.
  • Intellectual property rights and interests (e.g., patents, copyrights), upon receipt of income related to such rights and interests.
  • Any reimbursed or sponsored travel (i.e., paid by an outside entity directly to a provider on behalf of the investigator) that is related to institutional responsibilities.

Significant financial interests do not include the following types of financial interests:

  • Salary, royalties, or other remuneration paid by UW-Eau Claire to the investigator if the investigator is currently employed or otherwise appointed by UW-Eau Claire, including intellectual property rights assigned to UW-Eau Claire and agreements to share in royalties related to such rights;
  • Income from investment vehicles, such as mutual funds and retirement accounts, as long as the investigator does not directly control the investment decisions made in these vehicles;
  • Income from seminars, lectures, or teaching engagements sponsored by a Federal, state, or local government agency, an Institution of higher education as defined at 20 U.S.C. 1001(a), an academic teaching hospital, a medical center, or a research institute that is affiliated with an Institution of higher education;
  • Income from service on advisory committees or review panels for a Federal, state, or local government agency, an Institution of higher education as defined at 20 U.S.C. 1001(a), an academic teaching hospital, a medical center, or a research institute that is affiliated with an Institution of higher education.

Financial Conflicts of Interest Disclosure Forms will be reviewed first by the investigator’s department Chair or equivalent, then by the appropriate Dean or equivalent, and finally by the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Research. When reviewing the forms, should a potential or actual conflict be identified, the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Research may convene an ad-hoc committee to explore the situation further. The committee will make a recommendation about whether the significant financial interest is related to the investigator’s institutional responsibilities, whether it relates to PHS-funded research, and whether it is a financial conflict of interest. If the committee concludes that a financial conflict of interest exists, they will also make recommendations for development and implementation of a management plan, including appropriate compliance monitoring.

Deliberate misrepresentation of information provided on Financial Conflicts of Interest Disclosure Forms or failure to comply with the terms of this policy may result in sanctions, including discipline, loss of privilege to serve as an investigator on PHS-funded research projects, and dismissal. Instances of noncompliance trigger obligations for UW-Eau Claire to conduct a retrospective review of the research conducted during the period of noncompliance to ensure that it was not biased in its design, conduct, or reporting. If bias is found, the sponsor must be notified and a mitigation report submitted. Financial conflict of interest reports must be submitted annually thereafter.

If the NIH determines that one of its funded clinical research projects whose purpose is to evaluate the safety or effectiveness of a drug, medical device or treatment has been designed, conducted or reported by an investigator with a financial conflict of interest that was not managed or reported by UW-Eau Claire, the investigator involved will be required to disclose the financial conflict of interest in each public presentation of the results of the research and to request an addendum to previously published presentations.

Information concerning financial conflicts of interest held by investigators will be made accessible consistent with federal regulations. Records relating to all investigator disclosures of financial interests and UW-Eau Claire’s review of, or response to, such disclosures (whether or not a disclosure resulted in a financial conflict of interest determination), and all actions under UW-Eau Claire’s policy or retrospective review, if applicable, will be maintained for at least three years from the date the final expenditures report is submitted.

B. Training
The investigator is responsible for successfully completing financial conflict of interest training on the federal regulation, on disclosure responsibilities, and on this UW-Eau Claire policy prior to engaging in PHS-funded research and at least every four years thereafter. Investigators who come to UW-Eau Claire from other institutions must undergo UW-Eau Claire’s training prior to the expenditure of funds on a PHS-funded research project. Should UW-Eau Claire find that an investigator is not in compliance with the policy or a financial conflict of interest management plan, retraining will be necessary. In the event UW-Eau Claire revises its financial conflict of interest policy and procedures in any manner that affects the requirements of investigators, retraining will be necessary.

C. Treatment of Subcontractors, Subrecipients, and Collaborators
When UW-Eau Claire carries out a PHS-funded grant or cooperative agreement through subcontractors, subrecipients or collaborators, UW-Eau Claire must take reasonable steps to ensure that the subrecipient investigator is in compliance with federal regulations. UW-Eau Claire fulfills this requirement by setting forth the obligations of each party with respect to conflict of interest management and reporting in the agreement between the parties.

III. Definitions

The PHS regulations provide the following key definitions of terms.

Disclosure of significant financial interests means an Investigator's disclosure of significant financial interests to an Institution.

Financial conflict of interest (FCOI) means a significant financial interest that could directly and significantly affect the design, conduct, or reporting of PHS-funded research.

FCOI report means an Institution's report of a financial conflict of interest to a PHS Awarding Component.

Financial interest means anything of monetary value, whether or not the value is readily ascertainable.

HHS means the United States Department of Health and Human Services, and any components of the Department to which the authority involved may be delegated.

Institution means any domestic or foreign, public or private, entity or organization (excluding a Federal agency) that is applying for, or that receives, PHS research funding.

Institutional responsibilities means an Investigator's professional responsibilities on behalf of the Institution, and as defined by the Institution in its policy on financial conflicts of interest, which may include for example: activities such as research, research consultation, teaching, professional practice, institutional committee memberships, and service on panels such as Institutional Review Boards or Data and Safety Monitoring Boards.

Investigator means the project director or principal Investigator and any other person, regardless of title or position, who is responsible for the design, conduct, or reporting of research funded by the PHS, or proposed for such funding, which may include, for example, collaborators or consultants.

Manage means taking action to address a financial conflict of interest, which can include reducing or eliminating the financial conflict of interest, to ensure, to the extent possible, that the design, conduct, and reporting of research will be free from bias.

PD/PI means a project director or principal Investigator of a PHS-funded research project; the PD/PI is included in the definitions of senior/key personnel and Investigator under this subpart.

PHS means the Public Health Service of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and any components of the PHS to which the authority involved may be delegated, including the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

PHS Awarding Component means the organizational unit of the PHS that funds the research that is subject to this subpart.

Public Health Service Act or PHS Act means the statute codified at 42 U.S.C. 201 et seq.

Research means a systematic investigation, study or experiment designed to develop or contribute to generalizable knowledge relating broadly to public health, including behavioral and social-sciences research. The term encompasses basic and applied research (e.g., a published article, book or book chapter) and product development (e.g., a diagnostic test or drug). As used in this subpart, the term includes any such activity for which research funding is available from a PHS Awarding Component through a grant or cooperative agreement, whether authorized under the PHS Act or other statutory authority, such as a research grant, career development award, center grant, individual fellowship award, infrastructure award, institutional training grant, program project, or research resources award.

Senior/key personnel means the PD/PI and any other person identified as senior/key personnel by the Institution in the grant application, progress report, or any other report submitted to the PHS by the Institution under this subpart.

Significant financial interest means:
(1) A financial interest consisting of one or more of the following interests of the Investigator (and those of the Investigator's spouse and dependent children) that reasonably appears to be related to the Investigator's institutional responsibilities:

(i) With regard to any publicly traded entity, a significant financial interest exists if the value of any remuneration received from the entity in the twelve months preceding the disclosure and the value of any equity interest in the entity as of the date of disclosure, when aggregated, exceeds $5,000. For purposes of this definition, remuneration includes salary and any payment for services not otherwise identified as salary (e.g., consulting fees, honoraria, paid authorship); equity interest includes any stock, stock option, or other ownership interest, as determined through reference to public prices or other reasonable measures of fair market value;

(ii) With regard to any non-publicly traded entity, a significant financial interest exists if the value of any remuneration received from the entity in the twelve months preceding the disclosure, when aggregated, exceeds $5,000, or when the Investigator (or the Investigator's spouse or dependent children) holds any equity interest (e.g., stock, stock option, or other ownership interest); or

(iii) Intellectual property rights and interests (e.g., patents, copyrights), upon receipt of income related to such rights and interests.

(2) Investigators also must disclose the occurrence of any reimbursed or sponsored travel (i.e., that which is paid on behalf of the Investigator and not reimbursed to the Investigator so that the exact monetary value may not be readily available), related to their institutional responsibilities; provided, however, that this disclosure requirement does not apply to travel that is reimbursed or sponsored by a Federal, state, or local government agency, an Institution of higher education as defined at 20 U.S.C. 1001(a), an academic teaching hospital, a medical center, or a research institute that is affiliated with an Institution of higher education. The Institution's FCOI policy will specify the details of this disclosure, which will include, at a minimum, the purpose of the trip, the identity of the sponsor/organizer, the destination, and the duration. In accordance with the Institution's FCOI policy, the institutional official(s) will determine if further information is needed, including a determination or disclosure of monetary value, in order to determine whether the travel constitutes an FCOI with the PHS-funded research.

(3) The term significant financial interest does not include the following types of financial interests: salary, royalties, or other remuneration paid by the Institution to the Investigator if the Investigator is currently employed or otherwise appointed by the Institution, including intellectual property rights assigned to the Institution and agreements to share in royalties related to such rights; any ownership interest in the Institution held by the Investigator, if the Institution is a commercial or for-profit organization; income from investment vehicles, such as mutual funds and retirement accounts, as long as the Investigator does not directly control the investment decisions made in these vehicles; income from seminars, lectures, or teaching engagements sponsored by a Federal, state, or local government agency, an Institution of higher education as defined at 20 U.S.C. 1001(a), an academic teaching hospital, a medical center, or a research institute that is affiliated with an Institution of higher education; or income from service on advisory committees or review panels for a Federal, state, or local government agency, an Institution of higher education as defined at 20 U.S.C. 1001(a), an academic teaching hospital, a medical center, or a research institute that is affiliated with an Institution of higher education.

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Investigator Financial Disclosure Policy


Filing Requirement

Consistent with applicable federal regulations (Federal Register Vol. 59:33242-33251 and 33308-33312, June 28, 1994 and Federal Register Vol. 60:35810-35823, July 11, 1995), and to assure timely processing of applications for federal funding, an investigator who is planning to participate in federally funded research or educational activities must submit a UW-Eau Claire Investigator's Financial Disclosure Form (IFDF) to their department chair or equivalent prior to University transmittal of their proposal to a federal agency. Federal regulations define "investigator" as the principal investigator, co-principal investigators, and any other person who is responsible for the design, conduct, or reporting of research or educational activities funded or proposed for funding by a federal agency.

University Research and Creative Activity Council

The University Research and Creative Activity Council (URCAC) will review potential conflicts arising under this policy. The URCAC shall be chaired by the Assistant Vice Chancellor of the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs and will consist of faculty and/or academic staff members who are experienced researchers and federal grant-seekers, as well as appropriate administrators. The committee shall meet as necessary to carry out its responsibilities under this policy.

Review Process

Within 10 working days of receipt, the investigator's department chair or equivalent must review, sign, and forward the IFDF to the appropriate Dean or equivalent.

The Dean shall review the IFDF within 10 working days of its receipt. If the Dean determines, after reviewing the IFDF, that no conflict of interest exists, s/he shall notify the investigator, the URCAC and the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs of the determination. Upon such a determination by the Dean, the expenditure of any awarded funds may proceed.

If the Dean determines, after reviewing the IFDF, that a potential for conflict of interest exists, s/he will notify the investigator, the URCAC, and the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs of the potential conflict of interest. If an investigator with a potential conflict of interest decides to proceed with proposal to a federal agency, the investigator must also send an abstract of the proposal and an explanation of why there is no conflict, or an explanation of potential solutions to the conflict, to the URCAC. If, after review of the submitted documentation, the URCAC decides there is no conflict of interest, the URCAC will notify the investigator, the Dean, and the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs.* Upon such a determination by the URCAC, the expenditure of any awarded funds may proceed.

If the URCAC decides that a conflict of interest does exist, it will convene a meeting with the investigator and the investigator's Dean. At the meeting, any party may suggest ways to eliminate, resolve, or manage the conflict of interest.** If the URCAC, the Investigator, and the Dean agree on how to manage the conflict, the URCAC will notify the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs that the conflict of interest is manageable and that the University can expend the federal funds if awarded.

If a conflict cannot be resolved or managed by the above process, an appeal process shall be provided. If an investigator requests an appeal, the investigator's Dean shall convene and preside over a [three to five]-member appeals committee, consisting of at least one representative from the URCAC, and other qualified persons appointed by the chancellor.

If the conflict is resolved or managed through the appeal process, the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs shall be notified that the conflict of interest is manageable and the university can expend the federal funds if awarded. If the conflict is not resolved or managed through the appeal process, the university may not expend any federal funds awarded. Conflicts involving funded research and educational activities which cannot be satisfactorily managed, reduced, or eliminated through this process will be disclosed to the appropriate federal agency.

If, during the course of the proposal review or grant award, circumstances concerning an investigator's significant financial interests change, the investigator shall submit a revised IFDF to his/her department chair or equivalent, and the above steps for reviewing the revised IFDF shall be followed.

The Office of Research and Sponsored Programs will maintain records of all Investigator's Financial Disclosure Forms and of all actions taken to resolve or manage potential conflicts of interest for at least three years after the termination or completion of the award to which they relate or until resolution of any federal action involving those records, whichever is longer. _____________________________________________________________

* A "no conflict of interest" determination could arise in the following circumstances: if the investigator's income is not from a "for profit" business; or, if the investigator's income is from textbook writing.

** One way a conflict could be managed is for the URCAC to appoint a 2-3 member project oversight committee. Ideally, members of a project oversight committee would have expertise in areas related to the investigator's proposed research area. All project oversight committees would be required to file annual reports with the URCAC concerning their ongoing role in the management of the conflict. Section 50.605 of Subpart F, 42 CFR Part 50, and Federal Register Vol. 60: 35822, July 11, 1995, includes several other suggestions for managing a conflict of interest.


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Glossary of Definitions

Reference: Federal Register Vol. 59:33308-33312 and 33242-33251, June 28, 1994 & Federal Register Vol. 60:35810-35823, July 11, 1995

Types of interests that are reportable:

Anything of monetary value that you and/or your immediate family* received from for-profit businesses, including but not limited to:

  • Salaries or other payments for services (e.g., consulting fees or honoraria)
  • Equity interests (e.g., stocks, stock options, or other ownership interests)
  • Intellectual property rights (e.g., patents, copyrights, and royalties from such rights, including books if published by commercial presses)

Types of interests that are NOT reportable:

  • Salaries, royalties, or other payments from the University
  • Income from seminars, lectures, or teaching engagements sponsored by public or nonprofit entities
  • Income from advisory committees or review panels for public or nonprofit entities
  • Payments from a single business if the entire amount of payments you and your immediate family* together received is less than $10,000
  • Ownership interest in a business if you and your immediate family's*  ownership interests in the business together represent less that 5% or less than $10,000 of the total ownership interests in the business

Formula to determine whether a financial interest is reportable:

  1. Do you and/or your immediate family* have a financial interest from or in a for-profit business that is reasonably likely to be affected by the research or educational activities for which you have received or expect within the year to seek and receive funding? If not, then the interest is not reportable. If yes, go to Step Two.
  2. Do you and/or your immediate family* together receive from such a business $10,000 or more per year, or is the ownership interest you and your family have together in such a business 5% or more, or equal to or greater than $10,000 in value, of the total ownership interest? If no, then the interest is not reportable. If yes, you must report the interests on the other side of this form (ifdf).

* IMMEDIATE FAMILY means your spouse and dependent children.

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Responsible Conduct of Research Policy


I.  Policy

Beginning on January 1, 2010, all undergraduate students, graduate students, and postdoctoral researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire who are supported by funding, in full or in part, from the National Science Foundation for research or education activities must participate in and successfully complete training in the responsible conduct of research. Undergraduate students, graduate students, and postdoctoral researchers supported by other funding sources, such as internal or external grants, may also be required by their faculty mentors to engage in responsible conduct of research training. The purpose of this policy is to comply with the America Creating Opportunities to Meaningfully Promote Excellence in Teaching, Education, and Science (COMPETES) Act (42 U.S.C.1862o-1), Section 7009. Training undergraduate students, graduate students, and postdoctoral researchers in the responsible conduct of research is consistent with the mission of the University, the goals of the Center of Excellence for Faculty and Undergraduate Student Research Collaboration, and the commitment of faculty to encourage collaborative interaction and promote excellence in teaching and learning.

II.  Procedures

The plan to train undergraduate students, graduate students, and postdoctoral researchers in the responsible conduct of research involves identification and notification, and training and verification. The Assistant Vice Chancellor for Research and Sponsored Programs will be the primary individual responsible for compliance with the responsible conduct of research plan.

Identification and Notification:

The Assistant Vice Chancellor for Research and Sponsored Programs will take the lead in notifying faculty of their obligation to ensure their student, graduate student, and postdoctoral researchers receive appropriate training in responsible conduct of research as part of their research project. In turn, faculty mentors will contact appropriate undergraduate students, graduate students, and postdoctoral researchers to inform them about responsible conduct of research training and timelines for successful completion.

Training and Verification:

The University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire’s responsible conduct of research training emphasizes instructional areas suggested by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Research Integrity and guidelines from the National Institutes of Health. Responsible conduct of research training may occur in three components.

  • Component I: All identified undergraduate students, graduate students, and postdoctoral researchers will be required to complete interactive online tutorials created by Ethics Core (http://nationalethicscenter.org/). Modules 1 through 3 will be completed sequentially, though they do not need to be completed in one sitting. The amount of time to complete the interactive online tutorials is estimated to be between one and three hours. The undergraduate students, graduate students, and postdoctoral researchers should complete the tutorials individually and on their own schedule, either prior to or in the early weeks of the research work.

    Interactive online tutorials overview researchers’ rights and obligations; collaboration, communication, and grants management; and intellectual property. More specifically, they address core elements of:

    • Data management
    • Conflict of interest
    • Research misconduct
    • Responsible authorship
    • Mentor/trainee relationships
    • Collaborative science

The interactive online tutorials have a built-in system for verification. During registration, identified undergraduates, graduates, and postdoctoral researchers provide their email address and indicate an affiliation with the UW-Eau Claire RCR Group. Upon tutorial completion, the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Research and Sponsored Programs receives an automated notification.

  • Component II: Undergraduate students, graduate students, and postdoctoral researchers who will be involved in conducting experiments with human or animal subjects may require additional responsible conduct of research training. Faculty mentors will be responsible for determining whether or not supplementary, specialized training must be completed and which areas need to be addressed. The undergraduate students, graduate students, and postdoctoral researchers should complete the additional training individually and on their own schedule, either prior to or in the early weeks of the research work.


  • Training in the ethical and appropriate use of humans as research subjects is now available online through our Eform system. See the What to Submit to IRB page for instructions on accessing the Human Subjects Protection Tutorial. Undergraduate students, graduate students, and postdoctoral researchers provide verification of completion as required by the Institutional Review Board.

  • Animal welfare training includes an online session through the Research Animal Resource Center (RARC) (https://pegasus.rarc.wisc.edu/training) and attendance at an Animal Care and Occupational Health and Safety session. Undergraduate students, graduate students, and postdoctoral researchers provide verification of completion as required by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee.


  • Component III: All identified undergraduate students, graduate students, and postdoctoral researchers will engage in individualized instruction related to responsible conduct of research as part of their working relationship with faculty mentors. Given the diverse areas and experiences provided at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, it will be the responsibility of faculty mentors to devise and provide education that is appropriate for the content, context, and discipline of the research. Faculty mentors will submit a verification letter annually to the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Research and Sponsored Programs confirming that suitable preparation in the responsible conduct of research occurred.


The Assistant Vice Chancellor for Research and Sponsored Programs will notify faculty mentors of instances of noncompliance with the responsible conduct of research plan and recommend a course of action and timeline for fulfilling requirements. In addition, the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Research and Sponsored Programs will be available to answer questions about the responsible conduct of research plan, direct faculty mentors to relevant online resources, and provide linkages to appropriate experts. This responsible conduct of research plan is part of the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire’s ongoing commitment to passing along high ethical standards to the next generation of scholars.

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Faculty Reassignment for Grants Policy


September 15, 2009

I. Policy

This paper sets forth UW-Eau Claire policy related to institutional financial support for faculty reassignment during the academic year. Faculty developing multi-year research applications for submission to a federal agency will have the option to request, associated with the proposal submission, one course reassignment per year during the funding period of the grant, should the nature of the work to be funded warrant it and it can show a connection to faculty/student research.  (Faculty with a grant for which no indirect funds are requested/allowable will not be eligible for the one course release.)  The Principal Investigator and the Department Chair will negotiate when the reassigned time will occur.  The University will support up to twelve such reassignments in any one academic year for federal grants awarded to UW-Eau Claire, and no more than one per year for a principal investigator. 

II. Procedure

Faculty will work with the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs (ORSP) on developing the grant application for submission.  Working with ORSP, faculty will seek to cover at least a portion of the cost of the reassigned faculty time through grant direct costs, where possible.  Additional funds to support the reassignments will be paid from the Provost and Vice Chancellor’s 150 indirect cost account.  The Department Chair, the Dean of the College and the Provost and Vice Chancellor will be informed via the standard pre-submission informational e-mail and the Extramural Transmittal Form of faculty requesting UW-Eau Claire commitment to support reassignment.  A minimum of five days is required to accomplish these administrative processes. 

III. Constraints

All requests for faculty reassignment on federal grant proposals must be approved by the Chair, College Dean and the Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs prior to submission.

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Policy on Research Participant Incentives

 

June 1, 2012

I. Policy

Use of participant incentives is a common research practice. It encourages and recognizes human subjects' participation in and completion of a research task or sequence of tasks, and it may be key to securing broad participation in a research protocol. Incentives may include cash, checks, and gift cards. The University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire balances its responsibility to maintain confidentiality of information about human research subjects with record keeping requirements of the University of Wisconsin System, grantor agencies, and the Internal Revenue Service. In situations where confidentiality is not related to human subjects but it is in the best interests of the study to maintain confidentiality, the same procedures outlined below will apply.

The overarching aims of this policy are to ensure: 

  • The confidentiality of research participants.
  • Timely, convenient compensation to participants to facilitate the progress of the study.
  • The appropriateness of the incentive for participation in the research study.
  • Compliance with relevant institutional, governmental, and grantor policies and practices. 

Please view the complete Policy and Procedures on Research Participant Incentives as well as Sample Forms.

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Extramural Funds Procedures

When you receive a grant award, review this list of extramural funds procedures, including a summary of which UWEC offices to contact for different types of expenditures.
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